Archive for January, 2011

Going on vacation

Posted in 100 day challenge on January 28, 2011 by dingobat

The next week or so I will be going on vacation so most probably there won’t be any updates during this time. The aim is still to try out a 100 photo techniques in a 100 days so I will have some catching up to do when I get home.

Vertical concentrated time-lapse (day 44)

Posted in 100 day challenge with tags , , on January 27, 2011 by dingobat

Todays post is a little technical but the process described yields an interesting result. I liked the idea from yesterday of a concentrating a time-lapse into one picture. The problem is that the number of photos that can be included in the picture is limited by the time it takes to manually cut out the individual parts and put them back together again. I researched on how to automate the process and found the open source software ImageMagick. This image editor has a very cool feature, it can be used from the command line and can process a batch of photos based on a script. To get the script part working in Windows I had to install Cygwin and run script through that (“Linux-like environment for Windows making it possible to port software running on POSIX systems” according to the website).

Luckily I found an already made script that did what I wanted it to do. What the script does is to cut out a vertical slice (a few pixels wide) of each picture in a folder and then “glue” them together into one picture in chronological order. The process is described in detail on this page.

These are my results applying the scrip on my kaleidoscope and ice melt time-lapses.

Concentrated time-lapse (day 43)

Posted in 100 day challenge with tags , on January 25, 2011 by dingobat

These pictures consist of squares cut out from time-lapse photos I have taken from the kaleidoscope time-lapse and the ice melt time-lapse. The idea is that by building a mosaic of part of these picture, a slice of time is portrayed in one frame. It would be really nice to try this out on a time-lapse with more activity e.g. a busy metro station or a “from dusk till down” time-lapse.

The first picture has the photos in canonical order starting from the midpoint and moving outward in a spiral, with the other picture this is reversed with the first photo starting in the upper left corner.

 

 

Mirrors (day 42)

Posted in 100 day challenge on January 25, 2011 by dingobat

Used a mirror to take these photos. Interesting effect, I especially like when they are oriented differently than normally (e.g. upside down).

Kaleidoscope lens part II (day 41ish)

Posted in 100 day challenge with tags , , on January 24, 2011 by dingobat

Just an add-on on yesterday’s post. This is the time-lapse video made with the kaleidoscope lens.

Kaleidoscope lens (day 41)

Posted in 100 day challenge with tags , , on January 23, 2011 by dingobat

I have been looking for a kaleidoscope for a long time. Judging from the toy stores I visited it does not seem that it is a very popular toy these day. I mentioned this to my brother and in no time he showed up with three different types of kaleidoscopes (two for creating abstract patterns and one that creates patterns based on what is in front of the lens).

I cut holes in a balloon and used that to fasten one of the kaleidoscope to the lens of my dlsr, this both kept it in placed and prevented some light leaks.

These are some of the results of shooting with the lens.




I also used my canon pocket camera with CHDK to make a movie of the kaleidoscope that created a moving abstract pattern. I experimented with both making a time-lapse and using the movie mode. The time-lapse can be found in the next post.

Glass and water as a lens (day 40)

Posted in 100 day challenge on January 23, 2011 by dingobat

Found a great guide for playing around with a computer screen as a backdrop and using it to display patterns. I stuck a wine glass filled with water in front of the screen and it worked as a lens that focused different parts of the scene then the camera lens, it looked nice when using a shallow depth of field. Maybe this could be used to shoot a portrait where the subject is only in focus throught a glass of water?